1975 Wesley old girls donate towards jaundiced baby care

BY: Severious Kale-Dery
Ms Harriet Wereko-Brobbey (arrowed), President, 1975 Year Group of the Wesley Girls Old Students Association, joined by some of her mates to present a dummy cheque to Dr Hilda Mantebea Boye (2nd left), Vice-President of the Paediatric Society of Ghana. Picture: EDNA SALVO-KOTEY
Ms Harriet Wereko-Brobbey (arrowed), President, 1975 Year Group of the Wesley Girls Old Students Association, joined by some of her mates to present a dummy cheque to Dr Hilda Mantebea Boye (2nd left), Vice-President of the Paediatric Society of Ghana. Picture: EDNA SALVO-KOTEY

The 1975 Old Students Association of Wesley Girls Senior High School, Cape Coast, has donated GH¢100,000 to the Paediatric Society of Ghana for the acquisition of two phototherapy light machines for two regions.

The phototherapy light machine is used for the detection and treatment of jaundice in babies.

The President of the association, Ms. Harriet Wereko-Brobbey, led the group to present a cheque for the sum, and expressed satisfaction that the group had offered its support to the society.

Saving babies

"We are proud to support such a good cause by the Paediatric Society of Ghana in saving newborn babies," she said.

“We decided to purchase one phototherapy machine for one of the regions, preferably Cape Coast (Central Region) because our school is located there. However, after the donation from the members, we had enough to purchase two so we purchased two, one for Central Region and the other for Western Region,” she added.

The Vice-President of the Paediatric Society of Ghana, Dr. Hilda Mantebea Boye, also expressed appreciation to the group, and promised that the beneficiary regions would receive their machines when they were purchased.

Support

Dr. Boye also called on individuals and groups to emulate the gesture of the Wesley Girls’ Old Students Association and support the Ghana Paediatric Society.

"We are still seeking funds to make sure other regions are also supported because newborn babies are dying from jaundice, and that is the only way to reduce the rate of death," she stated.

“We hope that by the end of the year all hospitals, especially the major ones in the regions, will have at least one machine for early detection and treatment of jaundice in newborn babies,” she added.