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UK coronavirus cases jump by 1,062 - the biggest daily rise since June 25

BY: Eugenia Adjei Mensah

A total of 1,062 people have tested positive for coronavirus today bringing Britain's case load to 310,825 in the biggest daily rise in six weeks 

The country has not seen an increase this large since June 25 - when 1,118 cases were reported in a single day.

The numbers come almost exactly a fortnight after Boris Johnson predicted a second wave in two weeks.

On July 28, a senior government source said Prime Minister Boris Johnson was 'extremely concerned' by outbreaks 'bubbling up', both at home and abroad. 

Scotland has reported 48 new cases today, while Wales has reported a further 26. 

The drastic rise in figures - up from 758 yesterday - may come as a shock to lockdown-sceptic revelers who flocked to Britain's beaches today. 

Swathes of beachgoers were pictured dotted along the coast this weekend - with many ignoring social distancing rules.

While case figures have shot up today, the country's daily death toll remains low after a further eight people who tested positive for Covid-19 died in Britain. Both Scotland and Wales reported no further deaths.

A total of 1,062 people have tested positive for coronavirus today bringing Britain's case load to 310,825 in the biggest daily rise in six weeks 

The country has not seen an increase this large since June 25 - when 1,118 cases were reported in a single day.

The numbers come almost exactly a fortnight after Boris Johnson predicted a second wave in two weeks.

The patients who died in England were aged between 45 and 89 and all had known underlying health conditions.

The region with the highest number of deaths was the Midlands with four. 

The government's schools minister has slapped down calls from England's Children's Commissioner to introduce routine testing when schools reopen in September.

Nick Gibb today said students and staff would only be tested if they displayed symptoms.

But Anne Longfield earlier called for checks to become 'part and parcel' of school life and suggested they should be done weekly.

She told Times Radio: 'I think it needs to be as regular as it needs to be for the infection to be caught... certainly not one-offs but regular occurrences so they're part and parcel of the running of a school.'

But speaking on the same programme, Mr Gibb later said: 'Anybody who shows symptoms in schools will be tested, not routine testing, the advice we have is it's better when people show symptoms.

'If they test positive the people that pupil has been in contact with will be self-isolating.

Everything we do is led by the science, the priority for the new 90-minute tests has to be the new hospitals and laboratories, the measures we are putting in place, the hierarchy of controls is the most effective measures of the virus.'

There were three deaths in the North East and Yorkshire, two in the East of England and one in London.

There were no deaths reported in the North West, where local lockdown measures in place in Greater Manchester and parts of east Lancashire were extended on Friday to include Preston.

Figures released on Sunday are usually smaller due to a delay in processing over the weekend. 

The figures came as a landmark coronavirus study found the risk of transmission in classrooms is minimal, ratcheting up pressure on the Education Secretary to fully reopen schools in September.

Boris Johnson is understood to have warned that Gavin Williamson's 'head will be on the chopping block' if pupils are not back in lessons next month.

The Prime Minister has declared resuming classes a 'national priority' and is planning an advertising blitz to urge anxious parents to send their child back to school.

His campaign was yesterday bolstered by encouraging scientific evidence which found a low threat of catching infection in schools.

Government Sage adviser Professor Russell Viner outlined the forthcoming Public Health England study and stressed that reopening schools was 'imperative'. 

As the reopening of schools was bumped to the top of ministers' agenda.