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Performance in English Language, Mathematics and Integrated Science drop at WASSCE

BY: Emmanuel Bonney
Head of Ghana Office of WAEC, Mrs Wendy Addy-Lamptey
Head of Ghana Office of WAEC, Mrs Wendy Addy-Lamptey

Performance of candidates in three core subjects, English Language, Integrated Science and Core Mathematics dropped in the 2018 West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) for School candidates.

There was, however, some improvement in the other core subject, Social Studies.

Presenting an analysis of the results for the WASSCE for School Candidates at the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) Distinction Awards Ceremony on Friday, the Head of National Office of WAEC, Mrs Wendy Addy-Lamptey, said performance in English Language dropped from 52.24 per cent in 2017 to 46.79 per cent in 2018.

In Integrated Science, she said performance dropped from 52.89 per cent in 2017 to 50.48 per cent in 2018.

“The performance in Mathematics (Core) was not any better as 41.66 per cent of candidates obtained Grades C6 and better in 2017 as against 38.15 per cent 2018. There was, however, a marked improvement in the percentage in Social Studies increasing from 42.52 per cent in 2017 to 73.25 per cent in 2018,” she said.

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Explaining further, Mrs Wendy Addy-Lamptey said WAEC was of the view that the drop in performance could be attributed in a large measure to the activities of rogue websites, adding that “these websites peddle fake questions which unsuspecting students tend to rely on instead of preparing adequately for the examination”.

She urged all candidates preparing for the 2019 examination to be wary of the fraudsters who were out to swindle them. Candidates, she said should concentrate on their books and try their hands on past questions.

The Chief Examiners’ Report, she said on the past questions was a useful source of information for prospective candidates, and could be accessed freely on the council’s website: www.waecgh.org.

For instance, she said, the Chief Examination for Maths (Core) listed some of the weaknesses of candidates as “translating word problems into mathematical statements; solving simultaneous equations; and solving probability-related problems, among others”.

“They have suggested that teachers should give students sufficient exercises in the various topics treated”.

Regarding English Language, she said poor grammar, spelling, the use of abbreviated words and the dearth of sufficient vocabulary on the part of candidates were some of the weaknesses identified.

“Some recommendations to improve the performance of candidates in this area include the reading of well-written materials to improve linguistic proficiency and once again engaging students in exercises in comprehension, summary and essay writing,” she said.