fbpx

Make impact wherever you are - Rev. Dr Spio-Garbrah

BY: Elizabeth Konadu-Boakye
Dr Ekwow Spio Garbrah (right), Chairman, African Business Centre for Developing Education, interacting with Dr Ellen Hagan (left), Founder and Director, Laine Services, and Dr Aramansa Barnor Spio-Garbrah (middle), Executive Director, Banor Memorial Hospital, after the women’s day celebration at Achimota Senior High School. Pictures: BENEDICT OBUOBI
Dr Ekwow Spio Garbrah (right), Chairman, African Business Centre for Developing Education, interacting with Dr Ellen Hagan (left), Founder and Director, Laine Services, and Dr Aramansa Barnor Spio-Garbrah (middle), Executive Director, Banor Memorial Hospital, after the women’s day celebration at Achimota Senior High School. Pictures: BENEDICT OBUOBI

A Board Member of the African Business Centre for Developing Education (ABCDE), Reverend Dr Aramansah Barnor Spio-Garbrah, has advised women to change their mindset and make an impact in whatever space they find themselves.

She said the world had come to gradually accept that women could make an impact and bring change and there was, therefore, the need for women to change their mindset and accept who they were to make the needed change and difference that the world needed.

She called on women to be interested and embrace leadership positions as they had the capacity to nurture and bring development wherever they found themselves.

"Exhibit those leadership qualities that you have within you and make a difference where you are and for everyone around you," she said.

She made the call at the ABCDE's International Women's Day programme held at the Achimota School last Tuesday.

Rev. Dr Spio-Garbrah added that women had the power to multi-task, nurture and pay attention to detail.

That, she said, the world had come to realise now and so women needed to capitalise on that and build themselves up.

Break the bias

The Co-Founder for Legacy Girls School, Dr Mrs Ellen Hagan, added that although women needed some policies to make gender equality possible, “women on their own are a contributing factor to some biases and gender inequality that we see in our society.”

"Parents, especially the women, ask the girl child to cook and make them to dish out food for their brothers. Why can't the boy child do that for themselves”? she asked.

That practice, she said, was harbouring gender biases and inequality, adding that women were the ones creating the "monsters" from home.

She called on women to step up and get involved in bringing the needed change that they wanted to see.

Adding her voice, an advocate for inclusive and equitable quality education (SDG 4), Ms Hawa Ibrahim, said when the biases currently being experienced were broken, women could achieve whatever they set their minds on.

Practices such as name calling among women when one wants to take up a leadership position, she said, should stop as it was a hindrance to the empowerment of women.

"If we want to break the bias, we need to break the bias within ourselves before it goes," she added.

The Chairman for the board of ABCDE, Dr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, also advised young girls to learn soft skills to add up to the formal education that they were receiving.