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Let’s use technology to preserve Ghana’s history — Zanetor Agyeman

BY: Daily Graphic
Dr Zanetor Agyeman-Rawlings
Dr Zanetor Agyeman-Rawlings

The Member of Parliament for the Klottey Korle Constituency, Dr Zanetor Agyeman-Rawlings, has called on Ghanaians and Africans to join forces to celebrate and honour the memory of all forefathers whose struggles and efforts led to the emancipation of the continent.

She said there was the need to do more to highlight its history, not only as a source of tourism but as a source of education and inspiration to the continent’s youth.

This will help the young generation who will be future leaders, appreciate the struggles and efforts of the forefathers who fought for the liberation of the continent.

In a statement to mark the 50th anniversary of the passing of a civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, historian and peace activist, Dr William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, popularly referred to as W.E.B Du Bois, Ms Agyeman-Rawlings said honouring him and others like him would serve as an inspiration and motivation to develop the continent.

“As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing of this illustrious man who dedicated his life to uplift our souls, let us honour his memory by joining forces to appreciate our history and use it as an inspiration and motivation to develop our rich continent,” she said in her statement.

Example

Ms Agyeman-Rawlings said Ghana could take a cue from other African countries that had leveraged technology to preserve its history and promote tourism as it also constantly reminds the current generation about the past.

“Years ago, I visited Namibia, one of the youngest on the continent, which won independence in 1990.

“When I visited one of the museums in Windhoek, the capital, I was moved by the use of simple technology to tell the story of Namibian independence and the bitter battles that were fought
with their German occupiers which eventually led to their independence.

“With minimal technology, we can enhance the history of this country in a manner that will inspire all to join the struggle to develop our country and Africa,” she intimated.

Fight, honour

The Klottey Korle MP said W.E.B Du Bois dedicated his long life to fight against racism, against wars and conflicts, seeking peace in a world that was full of division and discord at the time and his passing on August 27, 1963 in Ghana, was evident of his desire to seek equity and unity across the world.

“He was also keen on ensuring that the rest of the world recognised Africa, a continent rich in diverse resources, including the oft-unappreciated human resource.

Ms Agyeman-Rawlings, who is also the first daughter of late President Jerry John Rawlings, said the establishment of the W.E.B Du Bois Memorial Centre was no accident and more significant was the site for the centre - where he lived before he died.

“It was in recognition of the personal sacrifices the eminent personality had made in seeking the recognition of Africa and the clamp down on racism.

“President Jerry John Rawlings, my father – may his soul rest in peace – who was the Head of State at the time, led the process of establishing the memorial centre.

“As a Pan-Africanist himself, President Rawlings was eager to recognise all who had sacrificed significantly to lift the image of Africa and seek global recognition and development of the continent.”She said.