Wendy Enyonam Addy-Lamptey (right), Head of National Office of WAEC, Ghana, checking the material of a candidate at the Burma Camp Junior High School during her visit to the examination hall
Wendy Enyonam Addy-Lamptey (right), Head of National Office of WAEC, Ghana, checking the material of a candidate at the Burma Camp Junior High School during her visit to the examination hall

WAEC boss tours examination centres

The Head of the National Office (HNO) of the West Africa Examination Council (WAEC) Ghana, Wendy Enyonam Addy-Lamptey, has toured some examination centres for the Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE) to see how the examination is being conducted.

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She visited the Burma Camp Junior High School and the Garrison Junior High School, both in Accra, on the first day during which the candidates wrote English Language and Religious and Moral Education (RME).

Assessment, Advice

She said the examination exercise had started very well across all centres in the country with materials largely delivered in time, including some island communities in the Sekyere Afram Plains where drones were used to deliver the items.

“So far, it's been very good. We have about 2,123 centres across the country; all the information we have had has been positive. “Question papers got to their centres in time, though I must say that in a few places we had some 5-10 minutes delay, which was mainly due to traffic,” she said.

She urged the distributors of the examination papers to take a cue from first day’s development and move early to beat the traffic to deliver the materials in time. Mrs Addy-Lamptey noted that the stationery was delivered across the country about a week ago, and that every centre had received its stationery for the examination.

She admonished schools’ proprietors and headmasters to allow their pupils to write their papers without any interference or attempt to help them in the examination halls.  

“The challenge we have is, school authorities and others trying to ensure that their children pass. But the children themselves, if we allow them, they will write what they know and then they will go away if the adults don't interfere.

“I will ask that these teachers who seem to think that they are helping their children to stop it. They should leave these candidates to write the exams by themselves.

“I mean, it's a serious and a very bad thing to teach them cheating at this level. It is big trouble for all of us,” she said. Mrs Addy-Lamptey advised the candidates not to rely on any external assistance or try to copy or solicit answers from their mates to avoid any punitive measures against them.

She reminded them that collusion was an offence and could be detected during the marking of the scripts long after the examination was written.

Fund

On the funds released by the government, Mrs Addy-Lamptey noted that the GH¢55.8 million released was enough to conduct the examination. She expressed the hope that the government would pay the remaining balance which would be used for “marking, script checking, for processing of results, and we have been told that we will receive the money on time”.

She lauded the Ghana Armed Forces and WAEC officials at the Burma Camp for creating a very peaceful environment for the pupils to write their exams, as no teacher or parents were seen around the gated cluster of schools.

Mrs Addy-Lamptey urged parents to keep on monitoring their children and ensure that they did not stay up too long, and remained fresh minded in the morning to be able to tackle the examination.

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