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University graduate washes cars for a living; while waiting for better opportunity

BY: Lydia Ezit
Mr Boasiako at work
Mr Boasiako at work

Despite his graduation four years ago from the University of Ghana with a Second Class (Upper division) in Political Science with the Study of Religions, Mr Antwi Boasiako now washes vehicles at the Yaks and Sons car washing bay at North Legon in Accra in order to make a living.

Now 27 years old, Mr Boasiako has been working as a car wash attendant for about five months because many application letters he has sent to various institutions have not secured him a permanent job.

After graduation, he worked on contract with the National Health Insurance Authority but his contract was not renewed after expiry.

Mr Boasiako tried teaching too.

That worked for him only for a period after which he had to stop because his salary was not being paid regularly, causing him hardship.

In a chat with The Mirror at the car washing bay, Mr Boasiako said he was introduced to the job by his friend.

He said even though that was not the kind of job he wished for, he had no option at that moment because he needed the money for his upkeep and to earn some money to send to his parents and sibling who live at New Edubiasie in the Ashanti Region.

He makes GH¢30 a day and out of this amount, he feeds himself, saves a little and sends the rest to his parents.

Mr Boasiako’s routine includes cleaning the tyres of vehicles

He said one of the things that made him outstanding at the bay was his good customer service which often prompted customers to ask about his educational background.

Talking about what his job entailed, Mr Boasiako said his daily routine involved scrapping loose dirt, cleaning tyres, dusting, drying, cleaning seats, removing trash, polishing and carrying out all other things that ensured an effective operation of a car wash facility.

Asked how he felt about his job, he said he was not shy even though it wasn’t an easy job.

Mr Antwi Boasiako

On what he described with concern as “boys y3 shy” in Twi, meaning “boys are shy”, he explained that shyness does not put food on the table and encouraged the unemployed to take up jobs considered as menial, while waiting for better opportunities.

One thing was striking about Mr Boasiako’s utterances.

It was that of hope. The hope that one day, through an angel who will appear in a form of human, he would get a better job opportunity and that might even be in the corporate world.