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Togo opens general consulate in Dakhla

BY: Elizabeth Nyaadu Adu

TOGO has announced that it will soon open a general consulate in Dakhla, southern Morocco as it strengthens bilateral relations with Morocco.

The country’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Robert Dussey made the announcement during his visit to Morocco, where he met with his counterpart Mr. Nasser Bourita.

The Togolese Foreign Minister further reiterated his country’s support for the territorial integrity of the Kingdom of Morocco and for the Autonomy Plan which constitutes “the one and only credible and realistic solution to the resolution of this dispute.”

In a joint statement issued after the meeting of the two Ministers, Mr. Dussey hailed the efforts of the United Nations Organization as “an exclusive framework for achieving a realistic, practical and lasting solution to the dispute over the Sahara.”

The Togolese Foreign Affairs Minister further expressed Togo’s support for the search for a lasting solution that preserves the territorial integrity, unity and sovereignty of Morocco, under the exclusive guidance of the United Nations and in compliance with decision 693 of the Summit of Heads of State and Government of the African Union of July 2018.

Mr. Bourita, on his part, welcomed the participation of Togo in the Ministerial Conference to support the Autonomy Initiative under the Sovereignty of Morocco.

The two officials insisted on complying with the standards and procedures within the organs of the African Union and reaffirmed the relevance of decision 693 of the Summit of Heads of State and Government of the African Union, which consecrated the exclusivity of the UN as a framework for the search for a solution to the regional conflict around the Moroccan Sahara.

To date, over 24 countries have opened diplomatic representations in Dakhla or Laayoune to reflect their support for Morocco’s territorial integrity. The latest country to open a consulate in Dakhla was Suriname.

The Togolese Foreign Minister is in Morocco to participate in the first Ministerial Meeting of African Atlantic States, which would bring together 21 countries of the Atlantic coast, including about fifteen represented at ministerial level.

The event, held in Rabat, would provide an opportunity to develop a common African vision on this vital space, to promote an African Atlantic identity and defend with one voice the strategic interests of the Continent.

The ministerial meeting’s debates would focus on three themes, namely, “Political Dialogue, Security and Safety”; “Blue Economy and Connectivity”; and “Environment and Energy”.