Dr Albert Antwi-Boasiako (arrowed), Director-General of the Cyber Security Authority, with the accredited and certified cybersecurity service providers. Picture: CALEB VANDERPUYE
Dr Albert Antwi-Boasiako (arrowed), Director-General of the Cyber Security Authority, with the accredited and certified cybersecurity service providers. Picture: CALEB VANDERPUYE

51 Cybersecurity providers receive licences, accreditation

The Cyber Security Authority (CSA) has, for the first time, issued licences and accreditation to cybersecurity service providers, establishments and professionals operating in the country. 

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The licences and accreditation were issued to 51 players in the cybersecurity industry at a ceremony in Accra yesterday. The Director-General of the CSA, Dr Albert Antwi-Boasiako, said the authority had registered 226 Cybersecurity Service Providers (CSPs), 56 Cybersecurity Establishments (CEs), and 1,353 Cybersecurity Professionals (CPs). However, only 3.1 per cent of the registrants had met the requirements and completed the application process to receive licences and accreditation.

“Today, we gather to celebrate a landmark achievement that underscores our nation’s unwavering commitment to digital security and resilience, and I thank all of you for making this journey possible,” he said. 

Mandate

Dr Antwi-Boasiako explained that per the authority’s mandate in Sections 4(k), 49, 57 and 59 of the Cybersecurity Act, 2020 (Act 1038), the CSA had a duty to regulate cybersecurity activities within the country, which included the licensing of Cybersecurity Service Providers (CSPs), the accreditation of Cybersecurity Establishments (CEs) and Cybersecurity Professionals (CPs) respectively.

“To this end, the Authority in March 2023 officially started the registration process for the licensing and accreditation of  CSPs, Cybersecurity Establishments and Cybersecurity Professionals,” he added.

He said the authority’s approach to this cybersecurity regulation was consistent with its collaborative regulatory approach focused on inclusivity and best practices. 
“Since October 2022, we have been engaging all relevant stakeholders on the regulatory regime provided in Act 1038 by deploying different engagement strategies.

“This is reflected in more than 30 different industry engagements conducted across different sectors, including industry players, academia, civil society organisations and government institutions,” he said. 

Sanctions

Meanwhile, Dr Antwi-Boasiako cautioned that CSPs, CEs and CPs that were operating without licences or accreditation were in contravention of the Cybersecurity Act, 2020 (Act 1038) and would face appropriate sanctions, including criminal prosecutions and administrative penalties.

He said the CSA, in collaboration with the Public Procurement Authority (PPA) and other relevant stakeholders, was working to ensure compliance with the guidelines pursuant to the Cybersecurity Act, 2020 (Act 1038).

By October, this year, when the nation celebrates the Cybersecurity Month, he said the authority would not hesitate to name and shame non-compliant companies and players in the cybersecurity industry while it published the names of those in good standing to encourage the public to do business with them.

“For now what we are doing is to encourage those who are non-compliant to regularise their operations because we have to ensure that players in the space have the integrity and competence,” he said. 

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