Ghana’s Kente identifies Africans – Nana Addo

BY: Getrude Ankah Nyavi
Members of Congress wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest before the State of the Union address.
Members of Congress wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest before the State of the Union address.

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo  says Ghana's Kente has come to identify the African continent and its people.

"Kente" is a brilliantly colourful fabric, entirely hand-woven by Ghanaian weavers. The brilliant colours and intricate designs associated with Kente have definitely made this fabric the best known of all Ghanaian, and perhaps even all West African textiles. Every design has a story with a proverbial meaning, giving each cloth its own distinction.

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Kente

Kente cloth is usually worn for ceremonies, festivals, and other sacred occasions. It is also given as a gift for weddings, child naming ceremonies, graduations, and other special events.

Praising the country’s kente during Ghana's 61st independent anniversary parade in Accra, President Nana Addo said “Ghana’s kente has come to identify the African continent and its peoples. The kente best spells out the fact that we are a dynamic people, unafraid to put our best foot forward, and unafraid constantly to adapt our cultures and traditions. We wear it with pride and in style."


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Members of Congress wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest before the State of the Union address.

President Nana Addo further cited US Members of Congress wearing black clothing with Kente adornments before a recent State of the Union Address by US President Trump. The Kente was used to identify with Africa as the congressmen and women made a statement of support for African nations after Trump described some African countries as 'shitholes'.

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"A few weeks ago, in the hallowed halls of the United States Congress, as their President came to deliver the State of the Union Address, a group of congressmen and women wanted to make a statement of support for African nations. They draped kente strips over their clothing, and that said it all."