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Tue, Jul

Former teacher invents indoor football game

Mr Yaw Frimpong Manso explaining how Frndo soccer is played during an interview with the Daily Graphic

A former teacher, John Yaw Frimpong Manso, a citizen of Agogo in Asante Akim,has invented an indoor soccer game designed to generate the interest of the youth  in the game of football, educate and entertain them to appreciate the rules of the game and its technicalities.

The game, which could be played in singles with two players on each side, or in groups of two or three at each side, was also designed to assist the youth, in particular, to learn inter-positional changes in football and be more focused as they engage opponents during competitive matches.

Students in basic and second cycle schools in particular can also use the  board game, which would be launched late in September, to upgrade their knowledge about mathematics, especially on the concept of probabilities, in the course of  playing the game, dubbed, “Frindo soccer board game” The board game was made in Ghana but are being printed in China.

The concept of Frimpong board games (FRINDO) was initially nurtured in 1972 when the manufacturer was a student of Akrokerri Training College, but it was not until 1985 that it was perfected to become a world acknowledged game.

Even though it is yet to be launched in Ghana, a country of its origin, many countries in Europe such as France, United Kingdom, and Italy, as well as United States of America, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia among others, have already developed keen interest in Frindo soccer board game.

Speaking to the Daily Graphic in an interview, Mr Frimpong Manso said the game would be translated into many languages after the launch a in September for other nationalities to appreciate its value, adding that it is the only board game that uses the passion of football to develop education in a meaningful manner.

According to Mr Frimpong, due to the game’s entertaining nature adults can also play it at home as leisure, thereby reducing boredom at home.

“The game is engaging throughout because it enhances one’s knowledge and thinking skills. This is because it introduces question cards that have been developed for users as the game proceeds and could be used in organising quiz competition in all subjects while playing. Other subjects can also be introduced or integrated by developing similar cards,” Mr Frimpong explained.

He said developing the game single-handedly had been very challenging and therefore he needed the support of corporate bodies for it to be commercialised and exported to other countries.