23
Tue, May

‘Students in private tertiary institutions need government support’

Rev. Dr John Osei-Appiah

 

The President of the Neumann College of Nursing, Rev. Dr John Osei-Appiah, has appealed to President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo to extend some of the government support to students in public tertiary institutions to those in accredited private tertiary institutions.

He explained that support for students in private schools would lessen the burden on their parents and also encourage private participation in providing education for the huge number of Ghanaians seeking tertiary education.

Dr Osei-Appiah, who was addressing the matriculation of 250 student nurses at the school’s campus at Atwima Tekyiman in the Ashanti Region, added that the resources used to cater for students were from taxes which came from Ghanaians, including the parents of these private school students.

Another reason for calling for the support, he said, was that when students from private institutions completed their courses, they equally rendered patriotic service to the country, hence the need to support them too.

This move, he added, would also encourage more foreign and local investors to venture into education and help afford many of the young people the opportunity to realise their dreams of having quality education.

 

Manpower export

Touching on the vision of Neumann College of Nursing, Dr Osei-Appiah said the school would empower and equip the youth with innovations and excellent training that would enable them to compete for both local and global marketable and employable jobs such as nursing.

The vision also includes building professional manpower for national development and for export to generate foreign exchange for the country.

He stated that just as countries such as India and Philippines were doing, they would also export medical personnel to Great Britain and the United States of America (USA) to work for foreign exchange.

 

UDS

The Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University of Development Studies (UDS), Prof. Seidu Du Alhassan, expressed concern about the increasing rate at which Ghanaians monetised everything they engaged in.

He described the phenomenon as “crazy love for money” which had made some people abandon their fear of God and support for humanity. He, thus, urged the students to ensure that when they passed out, they would help others in need.