Mon, Oct

Updates: Turkey military coup attempt

After a night of explosions, gunfire and tanks rolling along the streets of Istanbul and Ankara, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told Turkey Saturday that an attempted military coup was over and the government was in charge.


Here is what we know so far:

• At least 161 people died and another 1,440 people were injured across the country.

• Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said at a press conference Saturday the situation was under control

• A total of 2,839 military officers have been detained, a source in the President's office said.

Here is the latest.

Update on injured in Turkey

There are 952 people injured under treatment in different hospitals in Istanbul. Most of them have been moved to Haydarpaşa, Haseki, Şişli Etfal and Göztepe hospitals, according to the Istanbul governors office.

Total injured persons across the country is 1,440.

The morning after the night before

As the situation in Turkey continues to develop, pictures are emerging of how the country looks this morning:

Why Incirlik Air Base matters

The base is the permanent home to units of the Turkish Air Force and the U.S. Air Force's 39th Air Base Wing, which includes about 1,500 American service personnel and civilian employees, according to the base's website.

From here U.S. troops conduct counter-ISIS operations and operational training.

The Pentagon said Friday that it is taking all appropriate steps to ensure the safety and security of service members and facilities

"We are monitoring the situation in Turkey closely and are taking appropriate steps to ensure the safety and security of our service members, civilians, their families, and our facilities. As of this time, there has been no impact to Incirlik Air Base and counter-ISIL air operations from Incirlik continue," a senior Defense Department official said previously.

Back in March, the Pentagon ordered military families to evacuate southern Turkey -- and primarily from Incirlik Air Base -- due to security concerns.

"The decision to move our families and civilians was made in consultation with the Government of Turkey, our State Department, and our Secretary of Defense," Gen. Philip M. Breedlove, commander of U.S. European Command, said in the statement at the time.