28
Tue, Mar

Latest Features News

Grid List

Some of the entertainers on a campaign platform

Features

Just a few days after popular actor, Agya Koo declared his support for then New Patriotic Party’s (NPP) presidential candidate, Nana Akufo-Addo, a recording of the actor swearing allegiance to the former President, John Mahama, went viral, bringing the actor into an uncomfortable spotlight.

Researchers have found that chemicals used in galamsey cause health problems

Features

In artisanal gold mining, gold is extracted mainly from alluvial deposits along rivers, waterways and terrestrial soils. Gold is then processed by crushing and grinding of the gold-bearing ore. The gold is extracted from the concentrate by adding Hg to form gold-amalgam which is normally roasted in open air to obtain “raw gold”. The elemental Hg evaporates into the air and is subsequently deposited onto land and surface waters, after undergoing oxidation to ionic Hg (Hg2+) through reactions mediated by ozone, solar energy and water vapour.

Danilo leading the way to the restaurant

Features

So, we're at this really fancy restaurant. The owner is a world-famous chef, celebrated as a fantastic cook. Danilo just brought me here to his restaurant which is set in one of the old colonial plantation houses.

The mention of Zoomlion in Ghana today conjures visible images of men and women in their trademark blue attire with orange-coloured jackets cleaning the streets, clearing choked gutters, spraying mosquito-infested areas or clearing refuse at public functions and in the communities. 

They are usually seen with brooms, shovels and wheelbarrows, or paddling their tricycles carrying refuse or with their spraying machines at their backs engaged in disinfestation exercises.  The multi-purpose refuse trucks of Zoomlion are common sights on the streets of every town and city in Ghana.

A typical funeral plan provides for the costs of burying oneself and can be extended to spouse, children

Features

Many people do not want to hear about funeral insurance policies because not everybody wants to be reminded about the inevitable. The way every human being would hate to know the type of casket to be used in burying them or their relations is the same way a chunk of the public sees funeral insurance policies.

Rice farms at Wheta Irrigation Project

Features

In the 1970s, Volta Region was a major cocoa producing centre in Ghana. However, the industry has abysmally declined, leading to widespread low income and poverty among farmers.

The shift from cocoa farming to rice cultivation is becoming the toast of many farmers in the region, bringing it into the limelight.

Since the launch of the then Bus Rapid Transit System and now Quality Bus service, popularly called Aayalolo by then President John Mahama on June 22, 2016, Aayalolo has come to ease the stress associated with public transport system in Accra and I say kudos to him. 

Most Rev Emmanuel Asante, one of the African Bible scholars who contributed to the Study Bible, Very Rev Professor Martey, immediate past Moderator of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana

Opinion

The Africa Study Bible explains why God admonishes against the use of fetishes and charms – either in African traditional religions or in the Christian church. Why does a pregnant woman put a Bible under her pillow?

Prof. Nana Araba Apt

Opinion

Tyler Perry used the following tree analogy to evaluate friends, family, acquaintances, employees,co-workers, and so on.

I remember how I felt when I completed my half marathon race a few years ago

Opinion

He was two years older than me, outspoken, and charming with girls. After a typical evening at the pub—where he was the centre of attention, and I was playing the supporting role—he looked at me and told me with a smile that there are only three paths to happiness in life: money, women and fast cars.

Leaders look on as galamsey destroys our environment

Opinion

What are we doing to our country? In the next five years, we will be killing one another for water if we do not stop this debasing attitude as a people. Why will we allow our short-term interest to take over our sustainability as a people?

Mr Takyi after his re-instatement

Opinion

It was a sad day for friends and family members of Mr Kwame Assuah Takyi when it was announced on October 25, 2013 that he had been interdicted as acting Deputy Director, Legal, of the Ghana Immigration Service (GIS).

 



 

Graphic Columnists

Grid List

Elizabeth Ohene - The Writer

Elizabeth Ohene

It used to say on my passport in the profession column that I was a Journalist. Now it says WRITER. The change from journalist to writer occurred in the early 1990s. The world had suddenly changed from the innocent place I had known where we journalists wore dust jackets with PRESS emblazoned on them as a form of protection in dangerous areas, to journalists becoming deliberate targets.

Elizabeth Ohene

Elizabeth Ohene

There are many things I want to write about today. The vetting by Parliament of nominated Ministers of State, the one-upmanship of the committee members is very much in your face. It does seem we must give them a crash course on how to conduct interviews to get something useful and interesting out of the nominees.

An IT system cannot add or deduct from votes obtained at the polling station and recorded on pink sheets

Elizabeth Ohene

I have toyed with transferring my vote to Ayawaso West Wugon which is the constituency in which I live in Accra. But somehow I haven’t summoned the courage to transfer my vote from Abutia which as the whole world knows, is my home town.

State institutions such as the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE), law enforcement agencies, Council of State, the health service sector, among many others, are weak and cannot perform their core mandates. The fault may not come from them but certainly it is a direct result of neglect.

Civic Realities

"Africa does not need strong men; it needs strong institutions, “ former United States of America President Barack Obama told Ghana's Parliament when he paid a state visit to the country in July 2009.

Next week will be a busy moment for the nation Ghana as its celebrates 60 years of nationhood. Since winning political independence on March 6, 1957, the nation Ghana has achieved some modest successes and made some strides to develop its economy.

From the First Republic to the present, various governments have contributed their quota and played diverse roles towards attaining this elusive economic emancipation. It  will, therefore, not be out of place to commend efforts made, though the nation could have done far better.

Regrettably, all these good gestures from our two leaders, and the peaceful transfer of political power from one administration to the other, brought in their wake some cancerous acts that seem to undermine the nations democratic credentials touted globally as one of the best in the sub-region.

Civic Realities

This fortnightly column has been on a short break since the year commenced. During the period, many things happened to the country’s governance process, some of which are very good, but others, not so good.

It was healthy watching our democratic journey unfold, particularly soon after the 2016 presidential and parliamentary elections. Ghanaians took their democracy much seriously when they came out enthusiastically to vote for their candidates of choice during the last elections.

Compared to some African countries, we can say our leaders are mature and it was refreshing observing former President John Dramani Mahama accept electoral defeat in good faith, while President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo showed magnanimity in victory. Both Mr Mahama’s concession speech and Nana Akufo-Addo’s victory speech were also very refreshing to say the least.

Making politics dirty

Regrettably, all these good gestures from our two leaders, and the peaceful transfer of political power from one administration to the other, brought in their wake some cancerous acts that seem to undermine the nations democratic credentials touted globally as one of the best in the sub-region.

For the third time, under the Fourth Republican dispensation, the country has witnessed transfer of political power from one different  administration to another. It began with the transfer of power from former President Jerry John Rawlings to the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) led by former President John Agyekum Kufuor on January 7, 2001; and from President  Kufuor to the opposition National Democratic Congress (NDC) leader, the late President John Evans Atta Mills, on January 7, 2009, and currently from President  Mahama to the opposition leader, now  President Akufo-Addo, on January 7, 2017.

In all of these transfers, the people have seen some redemption in the new administration and the same naturally goes for the Akufo-Addo-led administration.

Ruling at pleasure of Ghanaians

Indeed, lovers of good democratic practices were expecting the nation to have learnt useful lessons associated with the bitter transfer of power in the Rawlings/Kufuor and Kufuor/Mills era.

But the expectations have been dashed as acrimony, accusations and counter-accusations have become the order of the day and the current transfer of power from Mr Mahama to President Akufo-Addo is bedevilled with numerous challenges.

By their acts and deeds, particularly from the camps of the ruling NPP and the opposition NDC, it is increasingly becoming very difficult for the citizenry to know who is leaning on the side of truth or propaganda.

The game play, in the name of good governance, in my opinion, is making politics look really dirty and unattractive to the discerning.

Since the transfer of power on January 7, 2017, no day passes without the ruling NPP government accusing officials of the erstwhile NDC administration of not keeping faith with the people in the management of the nation’s assets and resources which the NDC strongly disagrees with, explaining rather that the NPP is being mischievous and disingenuous with the truth.

By the actions of both the NDC and the NPP, there is the need for caution in order not to get to a point where the people will feel let down.

Rawlings and God’s intervention

Former President Rawlings, on the way forward for the NDC after its 2016 electoral defeat, has explained that his call for God to lead the NDC is for members of that party to recognise and appreciate the divinity in noble principles.

 “If we cannot recognise and appreciate the divinity in truthfulness, justice, integrity, loyalty, faithfulness, good work, respect and concern for one another, the environment and the divinity in the golden rule, then the God we are fearing and worshipping is a big waste of time,” he told the Daily Graphic in an interview.

Furthermore, former President Rawlings asserted that “if we gave God his due, we would not have allowed mortals in position of power or authority to get away with negative or corrupt behaviour.”

By extension, the call and admonishments by the former President  in my view holds true for the entire nation if it is to encounter real progress and prosperity. If truth, justice, integrity, loyalty, respect and concern for one another are seen to be missing in our body politic, then clearly, our politics will be dirty and could get even worse for everybody.

Working for change

 President Akufo-Addo himself has time and again stressed the need for Ghanaians to be citizens instead of spectators, and it requires all hands on deck to effect the needed development change.

The time for empty and careless talk is over and the hour to effect change has come.

Already, the NPP government is rolling out its Free Senior High School programme in September this academic year. Other laudable social intervention policies are also on course for implementation.

The nation definitely cannot attain these goals if it is divided along partisan interests. That is why it will be in the collective interest of political actors to first and foremost work in the nation’s interest first.

Anything short of this will lead the nation Ghana no where and it will continue to play the catch-up game.

Ghana 60 yrs on

Next month, the nation Ghana will be 60 years old and in the life of the working person, he or she will be retiring from active service. In the case of Ghana at 60 years, what has it got to show! No doubt it has chalked up some success but a lot more could also have been achieved. Since every new year comes with its new resolutions, pledges, promises and declarations, I am hoping that the nation go through a fulfilling 60 years celebration which will steer the country along the path of clearly defined policy directions which will lead to sustained progress and prosperity.

Ajoa Yeboah-Afari

Native Daughter

Strange as it sounds, it seems to me that both opponents of President Akufo-Addo’s record large team and the President have something basic in common: their anxiety to get Ghana back on its feet.

Ajoa Yeboah Afari

Native Daughter

I can’t believe that 60 years after Independence, and despite decades of having had successive state offices dedicated to the welfare of women, rape victims still have to pay for the medical examination that is necessary for the case to go to court.

Ajoa Yeboah-Afari

Native Daughter

I don’t know what it is about parades featuring school children, but invariably watching them I find myself becoming emotional. There will be a lump in my throat and tears start stinging my eyes. That is how I felt on Monday, watching the Diamond Jubilee parade in Accra on television.

The educational system we have adopted is not bad. But we have to admit that not all students can profitably proceed from ‘O’ Level to ‘A’ Level.

Voice from afar

Many comments are made almost daily about the role and effect of education.  But what is education? Philosophers have discussed the matter and have not completely satisfied all the thoughts.  I will leave the erudite discussion to the learned and academics.

Mr Tamas Meszerics Blames EC for Tension during the recent elections

Voice from afar

The old-fashioned diplomacy I learnt makes me react angrily when foreign diplomats openly interfere in Ghana’s internal affairs.  Therefore when I read the headline in the Daily Graphic of February 28 that “EU Observer Mission Blames EC for Tension during the recent elections” I hit the roof.

Visitors should be properly attired. Ghanaians should dress like the President, but low-keyed. Foreigners must be in suit and tie or in their “traditional” dress.

Voice from afar

When a messenger next door came to tell my mother that she was wanted, she quickly removed the cloth she had on and put on another clean one.  One day when she was called, she rushed out without changing cloth.

On her return, I asked her why she rushed out without changing the cover cloth.  She said it was urgent, and for my “private information” my friend’s father was dead.

While 110 is by all standards big, we must not lose sight of the fact that even those governments which supposedly run lean governments had presidential spokespersons and staffers

Thinking Aloud

Everything rises or falls on leadership. No organisation, no ministry, no church, no family, no school, no business can go any further than the leaders who are leading. Rick Warren.

The diffused nature of the operations of the illegal miners coupled with the fact that foreigners, especially the Chinese are involved, and our seeming inaction give cause for the speculation that politicians, as well as senior security personnel are involved in the dysfunctional activities.

Thinking Aloud

For far too long we have paid lip service to the fight against galamsey. The activities of illegal miners have contributed to the destruction of rivers and equally destroyed the very basis of agricultural production.

Minister of Finance, Mr Ken Ofori -Atta

Thinking Aloud

Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked, leadership is defined by results not attributes.  Peter F. Drucker. Dr Martin Luther King has noted importantly that, “No man ever reached to excellence in any one art or profession without having passed through the slow and painful process of study and preparation.”