09
Fri, Dec

Let’s obey rules, processes governing 2016 elections

Clearly, the election fever has caught up with the whole nation. Many Ghanaians across the length and breadth of the country are preoccupied with discussions on the outcome of the 2016 presidential and parliamentary elections.

There is so much anxiety and uncertainty in the air, giving cause to some pastors to jump into the fray to prophesy, rightly or wrongly, the possible outcome of events.

In the midst of rising tensions, the Daily Graphic wishes to drum home the need for peaceful elections devoid of violence.

It is our wish that all stakeholders will continue to work hard to reduce the heightened tension, encourage the use of temperate language, be civil with one another and engage in healthy political discourses in the midst of diversity.

The Electoral Commission (EC), being the election management body, has the onerous responsibility to continue to enhance transparency and confidence in the whole process as we inch closer to D-day. It can do this by intensifying its engagement with all stakeholders, particularly the political actors and parties.

It is also the right time for the EC to be proactive by embarking on a vigorous public education on the rules and processes governing this year’s crucial elections.

The global community expects Ghana to build on its success story of multi-party democracy and issues of good governance after going through six successful elections since the Fourth Republic commenced in 1992.

In the opinion of the Chief Observer of the European Union Election Observation Mission Ghana 2016, Mr Tamas Meszerics, in an interview with the Daily Graphic, “The elections represent an opportunity for Ghana to build on what it has achieved in past elections. We very much hope for peaceful elections which build the confidence of all stakeholders.”

This places a huge challenge on the nation not to do anything untoward but continue to work to build the needed trust and inclusiveness in the whole electoral process.

Without the effective cooperation of the political parties, the EC alone cannot navigate the process to its logical conclusion.

Other stakeholders, including the media, the security agencies and civil society organisations (CSO), are all expected to play key roles in ensuring that the country enjoys peace before, during and after the elections.

The Daily Graphic has confidence in the ability of Ghanaians to rise to the occasion, as had been the trend in past elections.

We expect nothing short of peace because without peace development is adversely affected and the whole nation suffers.

That is why we must preach peace and act in such a way to promote same during the elections.